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  1. Ultra Strip Paint Stripper Back to Nature Ultra-Strip is used for maximum paint stripping action. Where speed of removal is critical, a lighter coat of Ultra-Strip will remove 1 to 4 layers in 15 minutes to 4 hours. For tougher jobs or coatings, a heavier application will remove the paint in one application. This product is environmentally safe, biodegradable, non-flammable, and contains no methylene chloride or caustic. It is odor-free and can be easily cleaned up with water. For application,it can be brushed, rolled or sprayed. It requires no neutralization (neutral pH). Use Ultra-Strip for maximum stripping action.
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  2. If the graphics are the vinyl press on type, then applying heat with a hair dryer will soften it so you can carefully scrap it off.
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  3. You can apply Totalboat 2 part Epoxy Primer both inside and outside and below the waterline. You always want to apply a primer on top of epoxy for the best adhesion. The Interlux primekote is only for above the waterline. You could use Interlux 2000E for both. The 2 part epoxy primer is a good primer for either Brightside, Wet Edge or any 2 part polyurethane paint. The 2 part poly will last longer but is much more expensive.
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  4. If there are a lot of layers of paint, it would require a lot of sanding. A paint remover will be quicker and easier on the non-skid areas.
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  5. There are a couple of choices. You could use a product like Titebond II wood glue or something stronger like an epoxy. You could mix some silica and epoxy resin together for gluing, or buy it already in a tube in our Thixo Product.
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  6. Just ordered Wet Edge and intend to roll and tip it on a vertical surface. It would appear that one would roll this on lightly then tip it in a downward direction as that is the way gravity runs. Never doing it before I am not sure. Most videos I see, it appears the tipper is tipping right to left or left to right. The question, does it matter? Or is the bigger trick to always tip from the wet edge to the dry and stay out of the rollers way? I plan to cut it 10% with brushing thinner. Didn't find this in the search but am sure its been asked a thousand times. Thx, Ron
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  7. I sail a 14 ft. fiberglass hull sailboat in fresh water. It is docked in 4 ft. of water in a 120 acre lake in NE PA. The boat spends a lot of time tied to the dock. We catch sunfish and crappies from the dock, and occasionally my grandsons consume these fish. My concern is that ablative compounds settle to where the foraging fish eat, and may be toxic in some way. Ive never needed bottom paint before, but there are finally tiny blisters in the gelcoat, so I think I may need to do something soon. Is my concern about toxicity off base?
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  8. Never got to painting last year so I'm back doing my research. I do leave the boat in the water (Lake Erie) and I am painting the whole boat above and below the water line. I was looking at an Epoxy primer (if thats best) and need help with what types of paint will hold up best. I have a cheap Harbor Freight paint gun I can use to apply if needed. Thanks for any help FireMurph
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  9. If you're looking to harden up rotted wood without replacing it, take a look at the Totalboat Penetrating Epoxy. That is a thin epoxy resin that will sink into wood and harden it up. It needs to be dry in order to work properly.
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  10. Penetrating epoxy will work well to seal the wood from water penetration. You will need to remove the paint so the epoxy can sink in. Blush will need to be washed with water and scrubbed with a scotchbrite pad. It will raise the grain so sand after fully cured and washed. If you are going to paint, it's recommended you use a primer over epoxy.
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  11. Yes, you can go over with Brightside, sand with 220 grit, wipe clean with denatured alcohol and apply a coat or two of Brightside.
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  12. The easiest way to fill the holes is using Thixo, just squirt it into the hole. A lot easier and probably better at completely filling the hole than thickened epoxy or Marine Tex.
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  13. You will need to sand just prior to priming and wipe with denatured alcohol. A two part epoxy primer like Totalboat Total Protect or Interlux Interprotect 2000E are good primers for aluminum, then a couple of coats of a single part polyurethane like Totalboat Wet Edge or Interlux Brightsides which are high gloss paints. Be sure to thin the primer with the appropriate primer and apply two thin coats, light sand and apply two thin coats of the topside paint.
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  14. Unfortunately #7 screws are no longer available. I would go up to a #8 which isn't much larger.
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  15. I'm thinking you can consider another approach. I like your half lap joint approach with or without fasteners. That would be a good place to use G/flex 650 because the added flexibility, which is not really that important here in and of itself, but that flexibility translates into excellent fatigue resistance. This would address the banging around and abuse you described. My thought is to make the panels and pre-coat them with a clear epoxy. Of course, I'm partial to West System 105/207 - but there are many good clear systems to choose from. I think 2 coats to encapsulate the panels plus a coat or two of varnish or clear urethane. (I like Captain's varnish or Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane). Now you have panels protected from the weather and ready to be installed as floating panels like the original construction. If it were my door, I would pre-coat the entire structure - rails, stiles, and panels - this way, then assemble the parts. Sand the lap joints with 80 grit before applying the G/flex. I would suggest that if you use fasteners that you embed them and cover with a bung. It will look very classy - a real deep bristal-type finish. Then all that needs to be maintained is the top coat.
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  16. Sikaflex is a thick white or black caulking, I would use either West Systems GFlex or System Three T88 adhesives.
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  17. If the epoxy is fully cured and not clear, it will not clear up with varnish. It may have some amine blush on it which can be removed with water and scrubbing with a scotch-brite pad.
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  18. Hi, Does anyone have experience using PVC boards or Azek brand boards for their vessels? I have been using it for house/window trim for a while and love it for its stain resistance, UV resistance, and it is a rot proof material. I have used a few pieces of it to replace missing hatch covers on my Mako 17' which have held up well over the past two years and stay looking very bright, a little shot of bleach takes off any mildew after the winter very quickly. I am looking to replace the old plastic panels which had been supporting underneath my center console. This old style plastic board was used to cover over the gas tank hole so that the console, slightly smaller, would fit over it. There is about 2" on the sides and 5" in front of the console that needs to be filled for the console to mount on. The old plastic that was used was worn down by the sun almost 3/16ths of an inch from what it used to be and it had become very brittle. I was going to trim out around the gas tank opening in the deck to re-mount the console on top. I was planning to use a few PVC boards from Lowes. I know it will go in easily and will cut nice, and route nice, and i usually use standard PVC cement to weld the pieces together. My questions are: Why haven't i heard of anyone else using this product on their boats? is there a problem with it i don't know about? When i go to paint the deck next year i was thinking of painting over the PVC boards as well to make them the same color as the boat, what primer would be recommended to go over this so that i can apply a top coat of Total Boat wet edge flat white? thanks -steve
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  19. Jon, Here's what I would do if I were you: 1. Prep surface with Pettit Bio Blue 92 surface prep. Spread onto a small area, scrub with a coarse scrub pad and then hose off residue. Repeat until entire hull is frosty and free of wax/gloss. 2. Apply 1 coat of Pettit Protect 4100/4101 White. 3. While the Pettit Protect is tacky, apply 1st coat of Vivid White. 4. Apply 2nd coat of Vivid White. I find rolling and tipping epoxies to make more of a mess than they help fix. Roll on the Pettit Protect in an even coat using a 3/8" nap roller and you should have a nice smooth surface. Just be mindful to not over roll the surface or you will raise stipple. Pettit Protect is sold as a kit with both Hardener and Base included. For Vivid, roll on with a 3/16" nap roller. If you want a really smooth finish, you can burnish the surface with 400 grit wet sandpaper to smooth out imperfections. For thinners, you honestly shouldn't need to thin either product, though if you're in a hot or windy area, having thinner on hand might be a good thing. For Pettit Protect you would use Epoxy Thinner 97 and for Vivid, the 120 Brushing Thinner. If you want a racing bottom on this hull, you will have to adjust accordingly and will be doing a lot more sanding. Let me know if you have any questions. -Ken
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  20. If you are looking for Hydrocoat in white, Hydrocoat Eco 1104 is a nice white color, and offers all the benefits of Hydrocoat technology including soap and water cleanup, low odor and premium multi season performance.
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  21. Keeping the boat well ventilated will keep mold from forming plus a dehumidifying product will help like: Along with a Tea Tree product :
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  22. You could set up a dehumidifier and a fan in the cabin to help dry out the core you couldn't get to. You will need to open it up as much as possible for it to dry out. It sounds like you may need to replace the core if it is that wet. If it is still intact and you are able to dry it out, it might be easier to replace the lower skin that was cut out if in good shape, otherwise you will need to do a new laminate. I know it's too late to do much, but it would have been an easier repair to cut the deck, replace the core, and then repair the deck from the top rather than working from below. You will still need to determine where the water is coming from and repair the leaks.
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  23. Yes, go to our website and type in Snap Fasteners in the search block to see what we have.
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  24. Yes, we carry all the supplies and equipment you will need to shrink wrap a boat. Here is a series of videos on how to do it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=f-ECRD88w3k https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wg7R8K-v76A https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=K4H32ZtXGL0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ecmcTmdCUn8
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  25. I do recommend removing the raw water impeller for the winter or long periods of storage. The problem is that over a long period the blades can obtain a set and will not pump properly. I've had problems before after just one season and leaving it in over the winter where during the next summer it disintegrates so I just put in a new one each spring.
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  26. If you are looking for an electric pump the The Shurflo Oil Change / Winterize System is a good unit. Pumps quickly and easy to use. If you are looking for a less expensive manual pump I'd recommend the Moeller Fluid Extractor Pumps.
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  27. I have a '88 aquasport 222 that has some dings,nicks,gouges,etc. I may want to in the fall/winter repair all of that ,and repaint or re gelcoat entire boat ,, I need a list of products that you would suggest for my needs .
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  28. I have bought high priced bulbs but none of them will pump hard.Would the fuel pump cause this problem?
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  29. Yes, that is the method for Smith's CPES and Varnish. You will want to sand any raised grain after the 1st coat dries fully prior to applying the second coat so that your finished result is smooth.
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  30. I need advice on stripping the paint off of an aluminum boat. What's a good stripper. Any Advice appreciated. Have worked with wooden boats, but never alum.
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  31. I'll try to answer some of your questions without writing a book. #1. Cracks around cleats are caused by not enough support or backing which caused movement in the fiberglass and gel coat. Remove the cleat, grind down the cracks and fill in with either thickened epoxy, or a fairing compound. Underneath the cleat, reinforce with fiberglass mat and a backing plate like G10 material. Gouges in the hull can be filled in with thickened epoxy or fairing compound. For product selection you should call to discuss the various options depending on the job to be done. 2.) In repainting the hull and deck. The fiberglass/gel coat should be repaired, fared out smooth prior to painting. You can start with 80 grit to remove the most material, then work up to finer grit when getting smooth and even and to remove heavy sanding marks up to 220 grit. When painting it is recommended to use a primer first, I suggest using the brand primer that is the same as the topside paint. There are a number of instruction videos on how to repair fiberglass and how to roll and tip paint that would be good to learn techniques on how to do it. 3)Plywood Floor. I would suggest sealing the plywood on all sides with a clear penetrating epoxy sealer first, then laminating fiberglass on the top side, sand and paint with a non-skid deck paint. It's best to call when ordering so we can discuss the various products.
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  32. I couldn't find anything in the West System data about being able to bend a frame that is scarf jointed and epoxied. You might want to call West System and ask them 866-937-8797. I would think that so long as it's fully cured, it would hold.
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  33. Bloxygen is also used on moisture cure finishes and other chemicals that are sensitive to moisture or oxygen. For latex paints, we recommend that users simply mist some water into their container (sides, lid, and surface) before sealing the container. For latex, this water will prevent the finish from drying out. If the container is rusty or has a bad seal, replace it or your leftovers will not survive.
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  34. Just some random thoughts... cracked fuel supply hose leaking vacuum (O rings included!)? Old Gas? Varnish in the carbs (fuel injected?) Electronic or points ignition? ws
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  35. If the paint is dry and hard after a day, I'd give it two more days to be sure it's fully cured.
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  36. Hello, I have a long old wooden boat that has a plank hull and a lot of the seams are separated with the widest being about a quarter inch. She has been out of the water for about a year and has completely dried up. I recently flipped the boat upside down to complete the repairs. She was left up on a beach for some time and a plank was smashed in slowly from the tides. It has a major crack from when this happened and 3 or 4 of the ribs are waisted in the corner. My thought is to replace the bad plank with clear redwood and half of the damaged ribs one at time with new oak. I would then secure the new plank with bronze silicon screws and glue it to the frames with resin. While she is out for repair I'd like to refasten the whole boat with #10 2" screws, 1 every 4-5 inches along all 33 ribs. I don't think the originals are very strong. After that I want to use 3m 4200 on all the seams. I thought about just fiberglassing the entire bottom but I think it would be better to fix her more traditionally with some modern science. I'm posting this to get some feedback and advice if this is a good plan. I have never built a boat before but I am good with my hands. She is a working boat and I'd like to row her for another 50 years. Any help is appreciated thank you!
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  37. You would apply the penetrating epoxy until it didn't sink in anymore. Then apply the varnish. I'd suggest about 7 coats of varnish.
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  38. You can sand it with a lower grit to get it close then finish sand with 220 grit. You could use the Interlux Pre-kote primer which they recommend for the Brightside paint. You will want to sand a larger area then just the filled in spot in order to blend in the paint so that it will be all the same level and not built up on one spot.
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  39. It's not advertising. We just started the forum and in order to have content for people to access and find solutions I've entered a number of topics that we get calls on frequently. If you look at the various topics you will see different people now with questions and answers. You will see that I make many answers and comments as I'm the company representative assigned to provide help and assistance.
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  40. I trust the old finish is varnish. The best thing to do would be to remove the old varnish down to bare wood. Sanding it off is one method. You could use a varnish and paint remover like Circa 1850 Heavy Body Paint & Varnish Remover, then rinse off and sand with 180 grit. If you are able to remove the old varnish, I'd recommend treating it with a clear penetrating epoxy sealer like Smith's CPES which will seal the wood from water and rot and also give it a good base for the varnish. Apply it until it doesn't soak in anymore. This will also strengthen the wood. I would stick with a traditional varnish like Epifanes CV1000 clear gloss finish.
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  41. First, your approach looks good! In order to get a flawless finish, you will need to reduce or fill the 80 grit sanding marks. You could sand again with 180 grit then prime or try a few coats of Pre Kote and sand that smooth. I'd recommend first sanding with 180 grit, then the Pre Kote, then sand that with 320 grit to get a smooth finish. Rolling and tipping the Brightside will work well. I like using a foam roller and a badger hair brush. Thin it enough so that it flows well and lays down without brush marks. The 4 thin coats are better than two thicker coats so you are good.
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  42. I have attached the 1-1/2" IVF1015MN onto plywood. I used 3M #74 Foam Fast contact cement on both surfaces, then used screws as well. Because of the dense vinyl layer and because the foam catches in the threads it is best to punch a hole with a 1/4" hollow punch, then drive the stainless 10 x 2" pan head sheet metal screw lightly into the wood. The foam doesn't get all twisted around the screw this way. I also made some 1x1 aluminum washers although fender washers would work too. Spaced the screws about 12-15". Although the glue really sticks well, over time, and in the heat of the engine room, I wanted to be sure, thus the screws.I do not believe the aluminum pins they sell would work well, because it would make the initial placement of the panel very tricky. Also we taped the edges with the 4" Mylar tape before installing. Not too difficult actually.
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  43. On my boat the insulation is hung on 1/2" plywood - the insulation is held on by screws with huge washers driven through the insulation into the plywood. I've also seen it done with spikes glued to the wall that the insulation gets pressed onto, then little caps that lock onto the end of the spikes where they push through the insulation to keep it attached - this is how it's done on metal.
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  44. Scotch Brite pads are a great alternative to sandpaper and metal abrasives. Woven nylon will not leave metal on substrate, that leads to rust and discoloration. Rinse and re-use.Heavy DutyMMM-05509: Heavy Duty Green #86 Scouring pad for heavy duty cleaning jobs. Use to replace scrapers, steel wool and metal sponges. Typical applications include heavily baked-on food and food processing equipment.Medium DutyMMM-08293: General Purpose Green Scouring Pad #96 The original synthetic scouring pad for everyday cleaning. Replaces steel wool and metal sponges. Non-rusting and resilient.MMM-07447: Maroon general purpose pads 7447 Most universally used pad. Used for scuffing before applying paint or primer. Great for cleaning and preparation work. Perfect for a variety of applications to clean, finish, grain, denib and defuzz. Use by hand, with a hand-pad block or on an in-line sander. Abrasive mineral: Very fine-grade aluminum oxide.Light DutyMMM-07445: Light Duty White Pads 7445 have fine mineral for very light cleaning. Use with liquid detergents for wax mold deflashing, highlighting and top coat rubbing of wood, cleaning of porcelain, stainless steel, chrome, painted surfaces and glass.MMM-07448: Ultra fine pads 7448 are used to finish sand after wet or dry abrasives in the 360 grit range as well as cleaning and scrubbing. Reusable. Excellent for final finishing and light cleaning. Abrasive mineral: Ultra fine grade silicon carbide.Abrasive Grit: 60 GritBRAND: 3MType: Pads
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