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Found 3 results

  1. Good afternoon, I have a 1963 Penn Yan wooden lapstrake that had its bottom replaced about 15 years ago. Paint adheres to all original strakes just fine. For the last 15 years, the "new" strakes don't hold onto the paint anywhere as well as the original. The new strakes are of similar material (plywood). I have tried belt sanding the new strakes to the bare wood and priming, then painting (white and copper bottom). Looks great but by the end of the season (3 months) it is peeling. I was going to try again with TotalBoat Primer and WetEdge. Sanding to bare wood first. Couple questions... primer states not to use above 90% humidity and less than 20% surface moisture (of wood).. Humidity I understand (Massachusetts). Surface moisture??? With one of those unreliable meters??? Should I doo something else to the bare wood before priming to assure adhesion??? Thanks
  2. So, I am (obviously) new to the forum. Hello, everyone :-) I'm trying to figure out the best thing to do to refinish and preserve a gorgeous wood trailer...and maybe a boat later ;-) I decided to ask people who know about boats, since it is a water related issue. So here's the deal; I have an awesome little teardrop trailer that I have been using for almost five years, now. I use it when I go scuba diving, and that usually happens from early Spring until early Winter. Oh, and I live in Western PA. So, no sun and almost as much rain as Seattle. All of the rain has caused the problem. The trailer was built by a cabinet maker, and he put his heart and soul into it. And fiberglass. He used a fiberglass/epoxy coating on the entire trailer, which would have been fine if I didn't use the trailer in inclement weather. Which I do. So towing it around in the rain (and sometimes snow) has caused the fiberglass to peel. A lot. I am deeply saddened by this. I am going to start the task of removing the peeling fiberglass this weekend. I've read that using a heat gun and a scraper is the best way to tackle that, so that is what I shall try. I do not, however, know where to go from there. I am assuming that once I get the fiberglass off, I will need to sand it all, and then apply some sort of "sealer" to the wood. I was thinking about using the penetrating epoxy. Any advice, tips or info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  3. I am experimenting with some scrap pieces of teak wood, to get a better feel for what its like to work with teak. I hope to build an outdoor patio table in the next month or two, and you really can't beat the timeless look of teak. My predicament:The plans I am looking at call for pocket hole screw and glue joinery. The screws will be stainless steel, but my understanding is that regular carpenter's or similar 1 part adhesives are ineffective on teak due to it's oily nature. Doing some digging online, I saw that the best course of action is to keep the glued ends rough sanded and wipe down with acetone before bonding and clamping. Are there other options? Would Gorilla Wood Glue work? I would strongly prefer to not have to deal with manually mixing ratios. Teak is too expensive to take a chance and have it turn out poorly. Your advice is appreciated!