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      The future of the JD Forum   07/31/18

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WEST System - Wooden Boat Restoration and Repair Manual : I am in the process of restoring a 12 ft. thompson wooden boat. this is a boat where the hull had a thin layer of fiberglass. Two questions first. the transom will ultimately be covered wit

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You are just putting off the inevitable. I always recommend replacing wood that has rotted. However you could try "Git-Rot" which is a very thin epoxy designed to penetrate the rotted wood and stabilize it. I don't know if Jamestown carries it. It sort of works. If the top end of the frames are rotted you would be best served to sister the frames. the best way is to cut the top of the frame away, cut the frame at about a 10:1 slope and scarf in a new end. The other way would be to cut a short section of frame from new wood and attach it to the side of the rotted frame.Good luckJon DavisDavis Boat Works

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You are just putting off the inevitable. I always recommend replacing wood that has rotted. However you could try "Git-Rot" which is a very thin epoxy designed to penetrate the rotted wood and stabilize it. I don't know if Jamestown carries it. It sort of works. If the top end of the frames are rotted you would be best served to sister the frames. the best way is to cut the top of the frame away, cut the frame at about a 10:1 slope and scarf in a new end. The other way would be to cut a short section of frame from new wood and attach it to the side of the rotted frame.Good luckJon DavisDavis Boat Works

 

thanks for your response. I was trying to find the easy way out. Much appreciated. Denny

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Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer might be considered. Follow the directions and work a small area repeatedly until saturated, then move to another small area and repeat. Cures clear and hard.

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