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Roll and Tip direction question

9 posts in this topic

Just ordered Wet Edge and intend to roll and tip it on a vertical surface. It would appear that one would roll this on lightly then tip it in a downward direction as that is the way gravity runs.  Never doing it before I am not sure.  Most videos I see, it appears the tipper is tipping right to left or left to right. The question, does it matter?  Or is the bigger trick to always tip from the wet edge to the dry and stay out of the rollers way?

I plan to cut it 10% with brushing thinner. 

Didn't find this in the search but am sure its been asked a thousand times. 

Thx, Ron

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It is important to use a foam roller and roll the thinned paint on in a very thin layer.  Don't worry about the coverage on the first coat.  Use light pressure on the roller so it doesn't generate bubbles in the paint and you shouldn't need to tip.  If you do tip to lay down any bubbles or stipple in the paint, use a good quality china bristle or badger hair brush dipped in thinner and patted dry.  It doesn't matter which way you roll so long as you are going from dry to wet which usually means ending with a horizontal roll.  If you are tipping you would want to tip from wet to dry usually horizontally on a vertical service.  If you are moving paint with the brush, it is on too thick and will usually leave brush marks or runs when drying.

 

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Was just afraid of orange peel so was planing to tip. I really don't want to as that is double work. Got it, thin 10% which will be really thin as it will be 80ish degrees when I do it. Roll little and roll lightly meaning don't load up the roller. Do a few feet then roll from dry back to the wet edge. Then just have a good brush handy if I accidentally bubble it up. So, all these guys on youtube ect. really don't need the tipper? Or, they are in a hurry to paint so they are laying it on thick?

Thanks. 

Ya, know, well I know you know, having a full site and a forum is fabulous customer service. 

Ron

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It all depends on what type of finish you are looking for.  In the videos they are more concerned with coverage than getting a smooth sprayed look finish.  You can get a smooth finish by tipping if you're really good at it but it takes some trial and error to get it down.  The other concern is that if it's applied too heavy, it will sag/run and it could top cure leaving the paint soft underneath and take a long time to fully cure.  In my experience working with these various single part polyurethane paints, it's best to roll out thin coats and not tip providing it lays down smooth without bubbles or sags.

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Well, I have two coats on one side and will do a coat in the AM on the other side.  I have 7' in height to do with some windows to cut around. Makes it tough with the heat to keep up with the wet edge on the right and the bottom as I work.  I am learning that managing two wet edges doesn't work. Takes too long to keep moving before an edge starts to dry in 80+ weather. 

So, hooked up my extension and am now rolling up and down the full 7' run about 2 feet at a time. Seems to be better as I have blush marks from my last coat from accidentally hitting a drying edge. After sanding the heavy marks out and coating again I am getting it. 

I am thinking maybe don't add any thinner to it as it is hot here in San Antonio. It is a challenge, but it is fun. I will get it. 

oh! 100 feet per quart? I have over ordered I think. They say go thin, I can do 160-170 feet per quart and cover well. Unless the paint is rated at 100 feet coverage meaning two coats. In case you are curious this is a fiberglass motorhome with a worn out gel coat. I believe wet edge will be a good solution. The total square footage with reduction for windows is about 420 feet. So I ordered two gallons. I figure I can get 2 coats on all it for about the 1 gallon of wet edge. 

The 3rd coat will be fixed sanded out areas and me doing it all a lot better once a get a rhythm going. It always looks so easy on YouTube lol. 

Ron

 

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Well, I am failing at this so have a question or two. I am putting thin coats on with a mohair roller 1/4 inch nap. Anyhow am now doing about 140 square feet with about 14 oz. of wet edge. They say you get 100sf per quart. I am around 280sf per quart. I am thinning about 8% should I just use wet edge straight out of the can? If I did it at a 100sf per qt. rate it would be running onto the ground I would think.

So I roll it on then step over about a foot. Roll again and work from new back into the wet edge. Then I lightly tip with the roller. Before I lightly tipped with the roller I would get obvious roller lines. So after everything is dry I get 4 or 5 areas up and down like my rolling pattern that look totally blushed. Almost like I missed the spot but I didn't.  

1. What caused it like rolling into a drying wet edge and pulling the paint or something else. 

2. If I repaint the entire plane I will just do it someplace else.  

Can I just fix these areas somehow like 600 grit then buff it out with a compound or lightly roll new just on the one spot feathering it out? 

I am really not frustrated just getting confused. I have painted square miles of houses in and out oil and latex. This is a whole other world. The blushed line by the green tape, I zoomed it the best I could in the sun. 

IMG_1149.JPG

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Ron,

Not sure why you are getting that line of dull finish, it could be that it was starting to dry when you went over it with the roller.  

You said you were using a 1/4" nap mohair roller.  Can't tell from the picture but I recommend using a foam roller, light pressure and thin 5 to 10% and it should lay down smooth.

You can sand that spot down and recoat.  Once you roll an area, walk away, don't go back and try to fix anything.  It usually starts to dry quickly and will cause more finish problems.

Hope this helps,

 

 

 

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Okay, so sand the dull spot only and run a wet foam roller on that line? Or do I have to the total 30' run again?  I will switch to foam and not run back over the wet edge as you noted. You can probably see my frustration, getting good shine out of the paint other than these dull spots.

Living in south Texas its humid and 90 degrees by about noon, so I rush through a side in the am. But as above I think you are right, its drying so fast when I roll back into the wet edge its already too dry to hit with a roller. 

 

Thank you

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