• Announcements

    • skiptabor

      The future of the JD Forum   07/31/18

      Thank you all for your participation on the JD Forums.  We have enjoyed answering your questions, providing project advice and technical assistance on this forum for a number of years. We believe that there are now better ways to provide this service for our customers and the community. With that in mind, we have made the difficult decision to discontinue the Jamestown Distributors Forum.   Our JD Tech Team is committed to being your trusted technical resource, and we encourage you to reach out via email, phone, social, product reviews, and to post questions using the Q & A 'Ask A Question' function on all product pages. Additional information can also be found on product page Technical Data Sheets (including detailed usage instructions and application data).   Thank You Jamestown Distributors 
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Bob_S

Penetrating epoxy, varnish,over teak trim (winter project)

5 posts in this topic

Hello All -  have just finished watching some videos on using penetrating epoxy and varnish on wooden boat seats and trim.None of the videos showed them using this system on teak. Unless there are reasons not to, I'd like to use this process on my teak trim. I have an "88 Mako with the original teak trim, not a lot of it and none of it is decking or surfaces that are walked on. The teak I do have is old and has been cleaned many times by scrubbing so is pretty worn.  Anyway, I'm wondering if those of you with a lot more experience than me think this would work out well or is the teak, even 30 year old teak, still too oily to work for this. Thanks in advance! - Bob S.

_DSC0783 copy.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Penetrating will work well to seal the teak prior to varnish.  After cleaning and sanding, wipe with acetone to remove any oils and contamination.  Thin the first coat 25% with acetone so it penetrates further.  (note: this will darken the teak in appearance)  Apply a second coat unthinned after the first coat has dried and been washed with water, sand with 220 grit.  Allow the second coat to dry 3 to 5 days depending on temperature, wash and sand with 220 grit and apply the first coat of varnish thinned only enough to flow well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much Rick..do these instructions apply to Jamestown"s penetrating epoxy with the cold temp hardener (crystal clear?)

Again, Thank you.

Best

Bob S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the same process whether it's the regular or cold formula.  The cold weather penetrating epoxy only use between 40 and 65 degrees.  Any warmer than that use the regular formula.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0