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    • skiptabor

      The future of the JD Forum   07/31/18

      Thank you all for your participation on the JD Forums.  We have enjoyed answering your questions, providing project advice and technical assistance on this forum for a number of years. We believe that there are now better ways to provide this service for our customers and the community. With that in mind, we have made the difficult decision to discontinue the Jamestown Distributors Forum.   Our JD Tech Team is committed to being your trusted technical resource, and we encourage you to reach out via email, phone, social, product reviews, and to post questions using the Q & A 'Ask A Question' function on all product pages. Additional information can also be found on product page Technical Data Sheets (including detailed usage instructions and application data).   Thank You Jamestown Distributors 
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RickW

What size thruhull for 2000gph?

2 posts in this topic

I have two 2000gph bilge pumps. I plan on putting one of the 2000gph below the aft cabin and the other 2000gph pump in below the front cabin. My boat is water tight and does not leak so there is rarely if ever any water in the bilge. These pump are just for an emergency situation so I would like each pump to have its own thru-hull fitting. What size thru-hull do I need for the 2000gph pumps? do I need to use seacocks in combination with the thurhull's? I plan on using an anti syphon lupe as long as I have the room. Any advise is very much appreciated. 

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I use thru-hull fittings that are the same size hose as the pumps output.  Seacocks are always a good idea especially if the thru-hull is close to the waterline because if the pump fails and the boat sinks below the thru-hull fitting closing the seacock could save a total loss.  An anti-syphon loop will prevent any waves or wash from going into the bilge.  You want to mount the thru-hull as high from the waterline as possible to a point.  The higher it is from the pump (head) the less water the pump will move.  If the height is more than 3 feet, expect a 20% loss in volume.  So a 2,000 gph pump would only pump 1600 gph.
 

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