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Norton Grinding & Sharpening Wheels : can you use the fine grit wheel stone to take out scratches in knife blade?

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Grinding wheels are normally used for removing a lot of metal fast. A fine grit wheel will leave you with a smoother finish, but also increases the chance of burning the metal (turning it blue). For scratches on the side of a flat ground knife, I would use sandpaper placed on a flat surface like a table saw. While holding the end of the paper with one hand, slide the blade across going from the edge to the back of the blade. Start with 220 grit wet/dry paper or emry cloth and go up from there for the desired shine. A hollow ground blade can be cleaned up by placing the knife in a vise, be sure to protect the handle with a rag, and using the same 220 paper by hand and rubbing in the same direction as the existing machine marks. The blade edge should always be pointing away from your hand.An alternative would be a buffing wheel with the rouge of your choice. Start with light pressure and keep the blade moving to ensure a consistent finish. Be sure the edge of the blade is facing away from the rotation of the wheel. This method can give you a mirror finish and will work on a flat blade too. As with a grinding wheel, things can happen fast so go easy and check your progress often.Regardless of the method you choose, Jamestown should have what you need.Be sure to wear your safety gear, face shield, safety glasses, etc., when operating power tools.Good Luck

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Based iOn my experience with chisels and turning tools, i dont think so. A fine wheel will give a smooth grind but it will have discernible grinding marks. I would suggest using fine carborundum or progressively finer emery cloth/ auto finishing sandpaper, irking up to 1200 grit. You might also look at micro abrasives fom another source

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